Last edited by Nitilar
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Andersonville; the story of a Civil War prison camp found in the catalog.

Andersonville; the story of a Civil War prison camp

Raymond F. Baker

Andersonville; the story of a Civil War prison camp

by Raymond F. Baker

  • 382 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Office of Publications, National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Andersonville Prison.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Raymond F. Baker, based on research by Edwin C. Bearss.
    ContributionsBearss, Edwin C.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE612.A5 B34
    The Physical Object
    Pagination20 p.
    Number of Pages20
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5522990M
    LC Control Number73601190

    Andersonville is a American television film directed by John Frankenheimer about a group of Union soldiers during the American Civil War who are captured by the Confederates and sent to an infamous Confederate prison camp.. The film is loosely based on the diary of John Ransom, a Union soldier imprisoned there. Although certain points of the plot are fabricated, the general conditions of Directed by: John Frankenheimer. The Andersonville prisoner of war camp, which operated from Febru , until the end of the American Civil War in , was one of the most notorious in U.S. history. Underbuilt, overpopulated, and continuously short on supplies and clean water, it was a nightmare for the nea soldiers who entered its walls.

    A chance encounter with the diary and letters of Civil War Sailor and prisoner of war (POW) Frederic Augustus James led to a curiosity about the six men hanged at Andersonville Prison while James was a POW there. The upcoming book The Andersonville Raiders is the result of two years of research, trying to uncover the truth behind these men. The Andersonville National Historic Site, located near Andersonville, Georgia, preserves the former Andersonville Prison (also known as Camp Sumter), a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the final fourteen months of the American Civil of the site lies in southwestern Macon County, adjacent to the east side of the town of well as the former prison, the site Location: Macon / Sumter counties, Georgia, United States.

    This one-page guide includes a plot summary and brief analysis of Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor. Published in , Andersonville is a historical fiction novel by MacKinlay Kantor. Told from multiple points of view, the story concerns the Andersonville Fortress that was used as a concentration camp by the South during the American Civil War. Andersonville is a must-see for anyone interested in the Civil War. A National Historic Site, nothing in Georgia delivers the full impact of the cost of the Civil War as do the thousands of graves tightly lined together at Ander-sonville. The park does a great job of telling the story of all Civil War prison camps.


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Andersonville; the story of a Civil War prison camp by Raymond F. Baker Download PDF EPUB FB2

This is a history of the Confederate operated Andersonville and Union operated Camp Douglas two of the most infamous prisoner of war (POW) facilities used during the US Civil War. It chronicles both camp's history from their opening to closing, and details what confinement was like for prisoners using offical records and survivor accounts/5(8).

The Andersonville POW camp was an interesting story, complicated by the fact that this POW camp was part of a civil war, rather than a war between independent states. There was a high degree of focused bitterness and incited hysteria in the situation which meant that there are strong and uncomfortable parallels between this piece of 19th century history and the events of the 20th/5().

Andersonville (Camp Sumter) Civil War prison was only in operation for little more than one year, from into In just a few of those months, however, it became the largest city in Georgia and the fifth largest city in the Confederate States of America.

During that time, it also became America's deadliest prison/5(9). Andersonville was a prison camp for Union soldiers during the American Civil War. The author uses the facts and some historical characters, blended with fictional ones, to tell the story of the camp and the wider war.

The story flows chronologically, but is interrupted by the life stories /5. This is an interesting novel that takes place in the midst of the Civil War. Coming from multiple viewpoints throughout the prison and on the outside, the book is centered on Andersonville Prison, a Confederate camp for Union POWs which had the highest mortality rate of any such camp during the war/5().

John McElroy () was an American printer, soldier, journalist and author, best known for writing the novel The Red Acorn () and the four-volume Andersonville: A Story of Rebel Military Prisons (), based upon his lengthy confinement in the Confederate Andersonville prison camp during the American Civil War.4/5.

The Prison Camp at Andersonville September 1, From the fourth of July until the first day of September, every day in those two months, I killed three hundred lice and nits. The following books are suggested reading for additional insights into the Civil War and its key battles: William Marvel, Andersonville: The Last Depot (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ), Ovid L.

Futch, History of Andersonville Prison (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, ; reprint ), Paul J.

Springer, America. From February until the end of the American Civil War () in AprilAndersonville, Georgia, served as the site of a notorious Confederate military prison. The prison at. Catherine Gourley has created an intriguing piece in The Horrors of Andersonville that is not only terrific for individual reading but also as a group discussion.

Informing her readers about the atrocities and acts of humanity that happened in Anderson, Gourley delves into the world of a Civil War Prison, where the conditions of the camps can be blamed on both sides of the war/5.

Set in the infamous Andersonville prison camp during the American Civil War, this book proposes that it was more than just human indifference that caused the starvation and endless suffering of the camp's residents/5.

The True Story of Andersonville Prison by James Madison Page () paperback; pages Truth can often be a subjective matter, colored by one's perceptions and perspective, and these are important elements to consider whenever someone offers the "truth.".

The True Story of Andersonville Prison: A Defense of Major Henry Wirz: The Prisoners and Their Keepers, Daily Life at Prison, Execution of the Raiders, the Accusations Against Wirz, The Trial.

by James Madison Page. I chose this book to learn more abt grt grt Uncle was held prisoner in the Civil first half of the book is a good build up,but the last half was just anti-climatic.I had some issues with l this was pages,it could have been shorter,it seemed like there was filler was added to fill in gaps in the story /5.

Get this from a library. Andersonville: the story of a Civil War prison camp. [Raymond F Baker; Edwin C Bearss; Frank and Virginia Williams Collection of Lincolniana (Mississippi State University. Libraries)]. MacKinlay Kantor won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in for his novel "Andersonville", an epic account of the notorious prison camp in Southwest Georgia which operated from February till the end of the Civil War.5/5(5).

Other Civil War Prisons. Allison, Don, ed. Hell on Belle Isle, Diary of a Civil War Banner Publications, Bryant, William O. Cahaba Prison and the Sultana sity of Alabama Press, Derden, John K.

The World's Largest Prison: The Story of Camp Lawton. The story of the prisons of the Civil War is a very sad one. Thousands of men died from disease and starvation, in some of the worse conditions of the war. In this video, join us at Camp.

Successful escape from Andersonville was virtually impossible, and it was much rarer than what has often been portrayed. Even most of those who managed to successfully escape from Andersonville did so between the Fall of through the Spring ofwhen the prison and its security systems were breaking down as the war ended.

‎A Story of Rebel Military Prisons (), based upon his lengthy confinement in the Confederate Andersonville prison camp during the American Civil War. Inhe was among dozens of men captured in a skirmish near Jonesville, Virginia, by Confederate cavalrymen under William E.

Jones. McElroy wa /5(26). MacKinlay Kantor's Andersonville tells the story of the notorious Confederate Prisoner of War camp, where fifty thousand Union soldiers were held captive--and fourteen thousand died--under inhumane conditions. This new edition will be widely read and talked about by Civil War buffs and readers of gripping historical fiction/5(4).Kantor's Andersonville is a fictionalized account of life in the Confederate States of America prison camp in Georgia for Union soldiers captured during the Civil based the book on.MacKinlay Kantor’s Andersonville tells the story of the notorious Confederate Prisoner of War camp, where fifty thousand Union soldiers were held captive—and fourteen thousand died—under inhumane conditions.

This new edition will be widely read and talked about by Civil War buffs and readers of gripping historical fiction.